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Art in America Review

“the leak in your home town” is an iPhone app that lets users see the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill whenever they see a BP logo. A user simply launches the app and aims their iPhone’s camera at the nearest BP logo. What the user sees is one of the broken BP pipes coming out of the BP logo, and out of the pipe comes the oil, pluming upward.

This work mixes computer generated 3D graphics with the iPhone’s video camera to create an augmented reality. The user is able to see the computer generated 3D objects at specific locations in the real world. The 3D graphics create the broken BP pipe which comes out of the BP logo.

An important component of the project is that it uses BP’s corporate logo as a marker, to orient the computer-generated 3D graphics. Basically turning their own logo against them. This repurposing of corporate icons will offer future artists and activists a powerful means of expression which will be easily accessible to the masses and at the same time will be safe and nondestructive.

This project was created by Mark Skwarek and Joseph Hocking and is a work in progress. First iteration shown 5/5/10 at BOS Cabaret 2010

shown at Famous Accountants

leak in your home town,BP,oil spill,iphone  app,mark skwarek,joseph hocking,augmented reality

(from wikipedia)

The Deepwater Horizon oil spill (also referred to as the BP Oil Spill, the Gulf of Mexico oil spill or the Macondo blowout)[3][4][5][6] is a massive ongoing oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, now considered the largest offshore spill in U.S. history.[7] Some estimates placed it by late May or early June as among the largest oil spills in the world with tens of millions of gallons spilled to date.[8] The spill stems from a sea floor oil gusher that followed the April 20, 2010 Deepwater Horizon drilling rig explosion.

The gusher, now estimated by the US government’s Flow Rate Technical Group to be flowing at 20,000 to 40,000 barrels (840,000 to 1,700,000 US gallons; 3,200,000 to 6,400,000 litres) of crude oil per day,[10] originates from a deepwater wellhead 5,000 feet (1,500 m) below the ocean surface.[11] The exact spill flow rate is uncertain – in part because BP has refused to allow independent scientists to perform accurate measurements – and is a matter of ongoing debate.[12] The resulting oil slick covers a surface area of at least 2,500 square miles (6,500 km2), with the exact size and location of the slick fluctuating from day to day depending on weather conditions.[13] Scientists have also reported immense underwater plumes of oil not visible at the surface.[12]

Experts fear that the spill will result in an environmental disaster, with extensive impact already on marine and wildlife habitats[14][15] The spill has also damaged the Gulf of Mexico fishing and tourism industries. There have been a variety of ongoing efforts to stem the flow of oil at the wellhead. Crews have been working to protect hundreds of miles of beaches, wetlands and estuaries along the northern Gulf coast, using skimmer ships, floating containment booms, anchored barriers, and sand-filled barricades along shorelines. The U.S. Government has named BP as the responsible party in the incident, and officials have said the company will be held accountable for all cleanup costs resulting from the oil spill.[16][17]